Chinatown Parade 2013

7 02 2013

Started in the 1860s by the Chinese in San Francisco as a means to educate the community about their culture, the Chinese New Year Parade in San Francisco have grown to be the largest celebration of Asian culture outside of Asia. It is named one of the top ten Parades in the world by IFEA, and is one of the few remaining night illuminated Parades in the USA.

Today, many chinatowns in the world celebrate Chinese New Year with a parade. In San Francisco, the parade is typically celebrated together with a series of other events, such as, flower market fair, community street fair, carnival, dinner, concert, and Miss Chinatown USA Pageant. The parade is now under the direction of Chinese Chamber of Commerce.

Future Chinese New Year Dates

Gregorian Calendar Zodiac Animal Chinese Lunar Year
FEBRUARY 10, 2013 YEAR OF THE SNAKE 4711
JANUARY 31, 2014 YEAR OF THE HORSE 4712
FEBRUARY 19, 2015 YEAR OF THE SHEEP 4713
FEBRUARY 9, 2016 YEAR OF THE MONKEY 4714
JANUARY 28, 2017 YEAR OF THE ROOSTER 4715
FEBRUARY 16, 2018 YEAR OF THE DOG 4716
FEBRUARY 5, 2019 YEAR OF THE PIG/BOAR 4717
JANUARY 25, 2020 YEAR OF THE RAT 4718
FEBRUARY 12, 2021 YEAR OF THE OX 4719
FEBRUARY 1, 2022 YEAR OF THE TIGER 4720
JANUARY 22, 2023 YEAR OF THE RABBIT 4721
FEBRUARY 10, 2024 YEAR OF THE DRAGON 4722

San Francisco: Chinese New Year Parade and Festivals 2013

Chinese New Year Flower Fair
February 2 – 3
Saturday 10:00am-8:00pm
Sunday 9:00am-6:00pm

Chinese New Year Day
February 10
Sunday

San Francisco Chinese New Year Parade
February 23
Saturday 5:15pm-8:00pm

Market and Second Street to Kearny and Jackson
Location of bleachers: Kearny Street (between Sacramento & California and between Pine & Bush)

Chinatown Community Street Fair
February 23 – 24
Saturday 10:00am-4:30pm
Sunday 9:00am-5:00pm

Grant Avenue from California to Broadway St.
Pacific Avenue from Kearny to Stockton
Washington and Jackson Streets from Kearny to Stockton


Sydney: 2013 Chinese New Year Festival

Launch
8 Feb 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Friday
FreeBelmore Park, Eddy Avenue, Sydney

Chinese New Year Markets
Fri 8 Feb – Sun 10 Feb
FreeBelmore Park, Eddy Avenue, Sydney

Dragon Ball
Sat 23 Feb 7:30 pm $60.00 – $70.00
Centennial Hall, Sydney Town Hall, 483 George Street, Sydney


London: 2013 Chinese New Year Festival – Chinese New Year Parade

PROGRAMME (Sunday Feb 10th 2013)

Parade: 10:00
Start from North of Trafalgar Square
End at Shaftesbury Avenue in Chinatown

Shaftesbury Avenue
12:30 Stage Show
Lion Dance, Lucky Money God, Hip Hop and Street Dance
Traditional Chinese dance, Canto-pop
Chinese Orchestra group and Magic show.
Presented by Spectrum Radio, Chinese Youth Radio.
BBC China, BBCchines.com & TVB Europe.
16:30 End

Leicester Square
12:30 Stage Show
Martial Arts performances and demonstrations
LCCA Top 10 Martial Arts Movies of All Time Award Presentation
16:30 End

Charing Cross Road
12:30 Hip Hop, Lucky Money God and Street Dance
Traditional Chinese dance, and Martial Arts performances.
16:00 End

Organized by London Chinese Chinatown Association


Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,


   


Chinese New Year Greetings

1 01 2009

Wish you a happy new year
恭賀新禧 gōng hè xīn xǐ

Happy new year
新年快樂 xīn nián kuài lè

May you have a healthy body and great strength
身壯力健 shēn zhuàng lì jiàn

May your wish come true
心想事成 xīn xiǎng shì chéng

May all things come your way
萬事如意 wàn shì rú yì

Wish you to be happy and rich
恭喜發財 gōng xǐ fā cái

May you have great luck in the year of ox
牛年行大運 niú nián xíng dà yùn

May you have countless amount of money in the coming year of rat
鼠年數錢數不完 shǔ nián shǔ qián shǔ bù wán


   


Travel Arrangement – San Francisco Chinatown

29 01 2008

 
Take BART to the Chinese New Year Parade in San Francisco!

Exit at the Montgomery or Powell Street Stations. The parade starts on Market, goes up Geary, down Post and ends on Kearny at Columbus. To plan your trip, visit www.bart.gov.

To avoid long ticket lines, buy a round trip ticket for the parade in advance at any BART station (tickets have no time limit). This is particularly helpful for families or groups traveling together — each person must have their own ticket and will skip long lines at the ticket machines by purchasing them in advance. To calculate your round trip fare ahead of time, visit www.bart.gov/tickets/calculator/fareCalculator.asp.

Discount BART tickets for seniors and children!
Visit BART Ticket Types for information about discount tickets.

To purchase your discount tickets in advance:
Purchase online at www.bart.gov/tickets/sales/onlineOrdering.asp or at one of the locations listed at www.bart.gov/tickets/sales/retailSales.asp. Enter your zip code to find the location closest to you to purchase tickets, and make sure to call first to make sure that they have the tickets you need available.

Parking At BART Stations
For a list of BART stations with parking, visit www.bart.gov/guide/parking/overview.asp and find the station closest to you.


Parade Route
 
Parade Route Map


Parking Garages

Union Square

  • Ellis-O’Farrell Garage
    123 O’Farrell St.
    415-986-4800

  • Union Square Garage
    333 Post/Geary
    415-621-6751

  • Sutter-Stockton
    330 Stockton/Sutter
    415-982-7275

  • Fifth & Mission Garage
    833 Mission/5th St.
    41582-8522

  • Four-Fifty Sutter Garage
    450 Sutter Street
    415-421-4444

Chinatown

  • Portsmouth Square Garage
    733 Kearny/Clay
    415-982-6353

  • Savoy Garage
    170 Columbus Avenue
    415-421-6057

  • St. Mary’s Square Garage
    433 Kearny Street, SF
    415-956-8106

  • Vallejo Street Garage
    Vallejo At Powell Street

Moscone Center/Yerba Buena Gardens

  • Moscone Center Garage
    255 3rd St./Howard St.
    415-777-2782

  • Museum Parc
    Third & Folsom St.
    415-543-4533

Embarcadero

  • Embarcadero Center Garages
    415-398-1878

Public Transportation

AC Transit: Serves Berkeley, Oakland and other East Bay communities. In SF, buses depart from the Transbay Terminal and Financial District. (510) 839-2882.

BART: Links San Francisco with the East Bay and Daly City. In SF, trains run underground along Market Street. Stops at Embarcadero, Montgomery, Powell, Civic Center. (415) 992-2278.

CalTrain: Rail service to the Peninsula, San Jose. In SF, trains depart from the San Francisco Cal-Train Station. 4th St./Townsend (800) 660-4287.

Golden Gate Transit: Serves Marin County, parts of Sonoma. In SF, buses stop on Lombard St., Van Ness Ave., Geary Blvd., Financial District, Transbay Terminal. (415) 923-2000.

SamTrans: Serves San Mateo County including the San Francisco International Airport, Palo Alto, Daly City. In SF, buses stop in Financial District, Transbay Terminal. (800) 660-4287.

Muni: For complete schedule information call (415) 673-MUNI.


   


Parade History

29 01 2008

In 1847 San Francisco was a sleepy little village known as Yerba Buena with a population of 459. With the discovery of gold and the ensuing California Gold Rush, by 1849, over 50,000 people had come to San Francisco to seek their fortune or just a better way of life. Among those were many Chinese, who had come to work in the gold mines and on the railroad. By the 1860’s, the Chinese were eager to share their culture with those who were unfamiliar with it. They chose to showcase their culture by using a favorite American tradition – the Parade. Nothing like it had ever been done in their native China. They invited a variety of other groups from the city to participate, and they marched down what today are Grant Avenue and Kearny Street carrying colorful flags, banners, lanterns, and drums and firecrackers to drive away evil spirits.

Since 1958, the Parade has been under the direction of the Chinese Chamber of Commerce. At that time, it was moved from the afternoon to the evening so as not to compete with the very popular Miss Chinatown U.S.A. contest. The Parade remained a local community activity along Grant Avenue until the mid 1970’s, when the fire department and ever growing crowds dictated that the Parade route be moved to wider streets.

When KTVU, Channel 2, started televising the Parade in 1987, the Chinese Chamber of Commerce realized that although the Parade would still represent the community,its growth would demand a commitment to higher quality and corporate sponsorship involvement. The Chinese New Year celebration was expanded to a two week Festival including a Flower Market Fair and Community Fair.

Today, the San Francisco Chinese New Year Festival and Parade is the largest celebration of its kind in the world, attracting over three million spectators and television viewers throughout the U.S., Canada, and Asia with the help of both KTVU/Fox 2 and KTSF, Channel 26 (Chinese broadcast).

The parade still welcomes a variety of other groups to join in the march, and still hopes to educate, enrich and entertain its audience with the colorful pageantry of Chinese culture and tradition. In order to retain the integrity of the Parade, participants are asked to tie their float or specialty unit to a Chinese cultural theme. We are honored and delighted to have representatives from other Asian cultures participating in this year’s festivities.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


   


Chinese New Year Parade in San Francisco

29 01 2008

Named one of the top ten Parades in the world by IFEA, the Chinese New Year Parade in San Francisco is one of the few remaining night illuminated Parades in the country. Started in the 1860s by the Chinese in San Francisco as a means to educate the community about their culture, the Parade and Festival have grown to be the largest celebration of Asian culture outside of Asia. Since 1958, the parade has been under the direction of the Chinese Chamber of Commerce.

Over 100 units will participate in the Chinese New Year Parade. A San Francisco tradition since just after the Gold Rush, the parade continues to delight and entertain the many hundreds of thousands of people that come to watch it on the street or tune in to watch it on television.

Nowhere in the world will you see a lunar new year parade with more gorgeous floats, elaborate costumes, ferocious lions, exploding firecrackers , and of course the newly crowned Miss Chinatown U.S.A. and her court. A crowd favorite is the spectacular 200ft Golden Dragon (Gum Lung) It takes a team of over 100 men and women from the martial arts group, White Crane to carry this dragon throughout the streets of San Francisco.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,